Project Analyze: The first truly exciting thing to ever happen to Excel, ever (yes, ever)

When was the last time you had a reason to get excited about Excel? Never, that’s when. Well, that all changed for me when I saw the demo I’m about to lay upon your eyes and ears!

First, a simple question: What would you do if you could just tell Excel what you wanted it to do for you, and it would? In the final video I’m making public of the confidential TechFest 2013 meeting that took place in early March, Microsoft demonstrates how they’re working on just that: next-level machine learning built straight into Excel.

If all goes according to plan, Project Analyze will make it such that you can simply type a phrase that states what you want done, and Excel will do it. I’m not just talking about adding some columns and rows together or just highlighting data, either; I’m talking about creating pivot charts and visualizing your data for you in ways that you’d normally have to be a fairly savvy Excel user to accomplish!

But enough with the mincing of words; let’s get to it:

So, for as awesome as this feature is, there’s one thing to be extremely upset about: Project Analyze isn’t in our grasp yet, and there’s no telling when it will be.

The good news is that Project Analyze already appears to be quite functional, so perhaps it will come along sooner than Office 16 — perhaps in Office Blue, if there is such a thing?

Whatever the case may be, I’m pretty excited about this feature, so I’m definitely going to be keeping my eyes and ears open for more deets.

And with that, I’ll wrap up this fun little TechFest 2013 demo extravaganza! If you missed the other two videos I posted, then you’ll definitely want to check them out: Fresh Paint in Windows Blue and Windows Phone speech improvements.

16 Comments

  1. This looks like an amazing feature. I will be curious to see if they can pull it off for mass consumption.

  2. I hate when the “share this” sidebar acts up, when I’m using pinch-zoom on my tablet. Could you please kill that sidebar, or detect when yur sie is visited from a touch device. Thanks.

  3. Just watched the video. Amazing stuff :)

  4. Can someone explain me how can I page between comments? On stories that have lots of comments I only see 3 and there is no pagination UI.

  5. Kim: The sidebar thing is definitely an issue. Thanks for letting me know! The rest of the site is responsive, but that sidebar is a plug-in.

    SmoledMan: The comment issue is due to pingbacks and trackbacks counting as comments, but me not displaying them. It seems a bit disingenuous for them to count as comments, but if it implies that my content is being discussed elsewhere, then I kind of don’t mind it. =)

    -Stephen

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